Professorships @ Neurosurgery


William H. SweetWilliam and Elizabeth Sweet Professorship in Neuroscience
William H. Sweet, MD
Chief - 1961-1976
Nicholas T. ZervasRobert G. and A. Jean Ojemann Professorship in Surgery (Neurosurgery)
Robert G. Ojemann, M.D.
Visiting Neurosurgeon - 1957-2010
Nicholas T. ZervasNicholas T. Zervas Professorship in Neurosurgery
Nicholas T. Zervas, MD (1962)
Chief - 1977-2000
Higgins Professor of Neurosurgery, Emeritus
Nicholas T. ZervasCharles Anthony Pappas Professor of Neurosciences (Neurosurgery)
Nicholas T. ZervasHiggins Professor in the Faculty of Medicine (Neurosurgery)
HMS Department of Neurosurgery
The highest honor a faculty member can receive is the appointment to an Endowed Professorship. Nominations are proposed by the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine and approved by the Governing Boards and President of the University.
Neurosurgery Department
Executive Committee
  • Chairperson : Robert L. Martuza, M.D
  • BIDMC : Ron Alterman, M.D.
  • BWH : E. Antonio Chiocca, M.D., Ph.D.
  • BCH : Alan R. Cohen, M.D.
  • MGH : Robert L. Martuza, M.D.
Harvard Named Chairs
Harvard University History of Named Chairs - Sketches of Donors and Donations
"Professorships of the Faculties of Medicine and Public Health"

William and Elizabeth Sweet Professor of Neuroscience in the Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery)
First Incumbent
Robert L. MartuzaDean of the Faculty of Medicine at Harvard Medical School celebrated (December 3, 2009) the establishment of the William and Elizabeth Sweet Professorship in Neuroscience.
Robert L. Martuza, MD, Chief of Neurosurgery was appointmented as the first incumbent of the William and Elizabeth Sweet Professor of Neuroscience in the Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery), Massachusetts General Hospital.

Robert G. and A. Jean Ojemann Professorship in Surgery (Neurosurgery)
HMS Ojemann Professorship
The professorship was established in honor of Robert Ojemann, MD, a long-standing member of the MGH Neurosurgical Service for nearly 50 years, and his wife, Jean.
Dr. Ojemann and his wife, Jean, set a tone within the department that is still felt today." "It is fitting that with such a long and positive history at the institution, their influence will be made permanent in the form of the professorship." A ceremony to honor Dr Ojemann was held June 9, 2009 at Harvard Medical School.
  • First Incumbent - Christopher S. Ogilvy, MD
  • Second Incumbent - open
Second Incumbent
Robert Ojemann

Nicholas T. Zervas Professorship in Neurosurgery
HMS Zervas Professorship (2001)
Nicholas T. Zervas
The Nicholas T. Zervas Professorship in Neurosurgery was established with a gift from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to create a professorship at Harvard Medical School. Another donor to the fund was the Thomas Anthony Pappas Charitable Foundation.
The Nicholas T. Zervas professorship in neurosurgery is held by a faculty member in the Department of Neurosurgery at Massachusetts General Hospital and was established by a gift from MGH. The new professorship honors Zervas, the Higgins distinguished professor of neurosurgery at MGH, who from 1977 to 2000 was chief of neurosurgery at the hospital. He is recognized nationally and internationally as a leader in both the basic and clinical aspects of neurosurgery. He is a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine, and has served as president of the American Academy of Neurological Surgery and chairman of the American Board of Neurological Surgery. Dr Zervas also was president of the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1993 to 2001.
Zervas received his MD in 1954 from the University of Chicago School of Medicine with honors, and he spent a one-year residency in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute (1956). He served two years as a Captain in the United States Army Medical Corps from 1956 to 1958. He then took his entire residency in neurosurgery at MGH (1958–1962). In 1960, he took up a clinical fellowship in stereotaxic cerebral surgery in Paris. In 1962, he joined the faculty of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, where he remained until 1967. From 1967 to 1977, he served as Chief of Neurosurgical Service at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. Zervas became Chief of the Neurological Service at MGH in 1977, a post he held for 23 years, until 2000.
He was named Higgins Professor of Neurosurgery at HMS in 1986 and Distinguished Higgins Professor of Neurosurgery in 2000.
During his tenure, he cofounded the Neuroendocrine Center at the hospital together with Professors Anne Klibanski and Chester Ridgeway. His particular interest focused on the transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors.
Among his notable research and clinical contributions was the development of radio-frequency hypophysectomy. Zervas was the first to treat Parkinson’s disease with stereotaxic cerebellar ablation. His other major interests included investigating the pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm and stroke, the development of a micro x-ray generator for treating brain tumors, and a transcranial method for measuring intracranial pressure.
Zervas has been Chairman of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Neurosurgery, Chairman of the American Board of Neurosurgery, and President of the American Academy of Neurosurgery. He is also a Fellow of the Institute of Medicine and the Academy of Arts Sciences. In 1999, he received an honorary doctorate of medicine from the University of Athens.
Zervas has served on the board of the New England Conservatory of Music. He was a Trustee of the Boston Symphony Orchestra for 15 years and served as President from 1994 until 2001.
First Incumbant
Paul H. Chapman, MD - Nicholas T. Zervas Professor in Neurosurgery 2001 –
Paul H. Chapman received a BS magna cum laude from Yale University in 1960 and an MD cum laude from Harvard Medical School in 1964. In the year after completing his residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital, he was appointed Chief Resident in Neurosurgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, and then Registrar in Neurosurgery at the Hospital for Sick Children in London. In 1978, he became Assistant Professor of Surgery at HMS, Associate Professor in 1983, and Professor of Surgery in 1999. His research focuses on pediatric brain and spinal tumors, congenital anomalies, hydrocephalus, and proton beam radiosurgery.
Ann Christine Tina Duhaime
Second Incumbant
The second incumbent of the Zervas professorship is Ann Christine (Tina) Duhaime, MD. She is chief of pediatric neurosurgery at Massachusetts General Hospital and director of the neurosurgical trauma program at MGH.
Ann Christine (Tina) Duhaime, MD was born in Providence, Rhode Island in 1955. She graduated from Brown University with honors in 1977, majoring in experimental psychology. Her M.D. degree was from the University of Pennsylvania in 1981, after which she completed her residency in Neurosurgery at that institution, as well as a Fellowship in Pediatric Neurosurgery at the Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia in 1986-87. An additional year in Pediatric Neurosurgery at Brown University was followed by a position as Assistant Professor at the University of Floridas Shands Hospital. In 1989 she returned to Philadelphia to take a position as Assistant Professor in Pediatric Neurosurgery at the Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia.
While at CHOP, Dr. Duhaime helped to establish the Pediatric Neurotrauma Laboratory and received funding from the National Institutes of Health for this research. She was also Co-Director of the Pediatric Regional Epilepsy Program. Besides performing the epilepsy surgery for children referred to this program, Dr. Duhaime continued to pursue her longstanding interest in the functional consequences of early brain insults by participating in clinical and basic research on mechanisms of response and repair specific to the immature brain, both in epilepsy and in trauma.
In 2001 Dr. Duhaime took a position as Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery and Pediatric Neuroscience at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center. She is Professor of Neurosurgery at the Dartmouth Medical School. The Pediatric Neurosurgery Research Laboratory included a number of investigators studying mechanisms of injury and recovery during immaturity.
In 2010 Dr. Ann-Christine (Tina) Duhaime was appointed the Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA . There she directs a general academic pediatric neurosurgical practice and has a special focus on epilepsy and functional neurosurgery, as well as being the Co-Director of the Pediatric Trauma Program and Co-Director of the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit.
Dr. Duhaime’s research on traumatic brain injury during immaturity investigates age-dependent differences in injury response and repair, as well as mechanisms of accidental and inflicted injuries; these efforts are funded by the National Institutes of Health and other institutions and foundations. Her work includes longstanding collaborations with bioengineers at both Penn and Dartmouth to study the biomechanics and consequences of various mechanisms of head injury in patients of different ages, from infants to adolescen
Dr. Duhaime is the current Chair of the Section on Pediatric Neurological Surgery of the American Association of Neurological Surgery and Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and she is involved in other pediatric and general neurosurgical and neuroscience organizations. She is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Neurosurgery and also serves as a Director of the American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery.

Charles Anthony Pappas Professor of Neurosciences (Neurosurgery)
HMS Pappas Professorship (1982)
Charles Anthony Pappas
The Charles Anthony Pappas Professorship of Neurosciences is the gift of the Thomas Anthony Pappas Charitable Foundation in response to an appeal from Nicholas T. Zervas (A.B. 1950, M.D. Chicago 1954), chief of the neurological service at Massachusetts General Hospital.
Over a period of eight years beginning in 1982, the Foundation through its president, Charles A. Pappas, contributed $1 million for:
. . . the Charles Anthony Pappas Professorship at the Harvard Medical School . . . . Except as provided below, the Charles Anthony Pappas Professor will serve in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital.
The incumbent, who will be known as the Charles Anthony Pappas Professor of Neurosciences, shall be appointed by the President and Fellows of Harvard College upon the recommendation of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine with the advice of the Trustees of the Massachusetts General Hospital.
It is the wish of the Pappas Foundation that the major scientific interest of the incumbent will have some relevance to degenerative disorders of the nervous system, although the research need not be restricted to any single disease or to a particular kind of research. The Pappas Foundation is interested primarily that the incumbent work in basic or applied research that may add to the origins, pathophysiology, or therapy of degenerative neurological disorders.
The President and Fellows accepted the gift and its terms at their meeting on 15 March 1982 and three months later, using the discretion allowed them, elected Adelbert Ames III first incumbent.
The Thomas Anthony Pappas Charitable Foundation is named for its principle donor, the Greek-born entrepreneur who made a fortune in a variety of enterprises springing from his original business as food importer and liquor distributor. Son of Constantine and Sofia Flamburas Pappadopoulos, Thomas was born in Filiatra, Messinias, Greece, on 24 October 1898. The father brought his family to the United States in 1903 and opened a grocery store in Boston’s North End. When he became ill in 1914 young Thomas, who had shortened his name to Pappas, took over the store. “Within a dozen years,” Newsweek reported on 21 January 1963, “the immigrant boy had sent his four brothers and sisters through school, put himself through night school, attended courses at Boston and Northeastern universities, and built the grocery into a six-store chain specializing in imported food.” With his brother John C. Pappas (1904-1972) as associate, Thomas Pappas expanded the chain still further and in the early 1950s sold it for capital to invest in new ventures.
Charles Anthony Pappas, for whom the chair is named, is the only son of Thomas and Bessie Bounakes Pappas. Born in Cambridge in 1932, he attended Tufts University (Class of 1955) before joining his father and cousins at C. Pappas and Co. In 1964 he took time off to try his hand as an investment broker at Harris-Upham, but after a year returned to the family business where he has served as vice president with special concern for food and liquor importing. He became a director of his father’s charitable foundation when it was established in 1975 and later succeed to its presidency.
Past Incumbents
Emad Eskandar
Fourth Incumbent
The fourth incumbent of the Pappas professorship is Emad N. Eskandar, MD. He is the Director of Functional Neurosurgery and the Director of Neurosurgical Residency Program at MGH.
Emad N. Eskandar was born on November 11, 1965 and now is a Neurosurgeon at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and an Associate Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School. He obtained his MD at the University of Southern California, and completed his residency training at MGH and Harvard. He is the Director of Functional Neurosurgery and Residency Director at MGH. Dr. Eskandar leads an active multidisciplinary program and collaborates closely with colleagues in Psychiatry, Neurology and Anesthesia. He specializes in employing cutting-edge surgical treatments for Movement Disorders, Epilepsy, Pain, and severe Psychiatric Disorders. For example, Dr. Eskandar is currently employing, or investigating, the role of deep brain stimulation in the treatment of Pediatric Dystonia, Parkinson Disease, and Major Depression. In addition, Dr. Eskandar is involved in studying the role of implanted stimulators to treat epilepsy and stroke. Dr. Eskandar also heads an active basic research laboratory investigating the Basal Ganglia, which play a central role in theories of learning, motivation, depression and drug addiction. His group uses microelectrode and electrochemical recordings to evaluate the role of the basal ganglia in both primates and humans performing complex behavioral tasks. The group also uses electrical stimulation to directly modulate neuronal activity during complex behaviors. This is a unique approach in that ideas from the laboratory can quickly be tested in the clinical arena and vice-versa.
The Eskandar lab has made important scientific contributions over the past year several years. For example, one recent study, published in Nature Neuroscience, found that the Cingulate Cortex plays an important role in linking reward information with action selection. Another recent study, also published in Nature Neuroscience, found that delivering micro-stimulation in the caudate nucleus, significantly increases the rate of learning beyond baseline rates. These findings suggest that the caudate plays a critical role in learning, and that learning can be enhanced to promote recovery after brain injury.
Dr. Eskandar has been the recipient of numerous honors and awards including the Grass Neuroscience Fellowship and the Excellence in Teaching Award from Harvard Medical School. He was awarded the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Physician Scientist Early Career Award. In addition Dr. Eskandar has several grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for his research.
Dr. Eskandar leads an active multidisciplinary program employing cutting-edge surgical treatments for movement disorders, epilepsy, and pain and an active basic research laboratory investigating the Basal Ganglia.


MGH Neurosurgical Service - Phone: 617-726-8581 - Massachusetts General Hospital - Fruit Street - Boston, Massachusetts 02114